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Benedict Cumberbatch supports Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola’s criticism of Marvel movies

"We don't want one king to rule it all and have a monopoly"

Benedict Cumberbatch is the latest name to lend his views to the ongoing conversation around Marvel movies, saying he supports Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola’s criticism of the franchise.

The star says that he “agrees” with the pair of directors, and that there should not be “one king to rule it all” in the film industry.

Scorsese started a war of words recently when he said that Marvel movies were “not cinema”, whileCoppola went even further, calling the films “despicable” and even saying that Scorsese was “kind” in his judgement of the films.

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Cumberbatch spoke of the conversation to SiriusXM, saying: “I know there’s been a lot of debate recently with some very fine filmmakers coming to the fore saying these film franchises are taking over everything.

“I agree,” he continued. “We don’t want one king to rule it all and have a monopoly and all that, and it’s hopefully not the case and we should really look into continuing to support auteur filmmakers at every level.”

Cumberbatch follows the likes of Iron Man director Jon Favreau in criticising Marvel, after the director said that Scorsese and  Coppola have “earned the right” to criticise the franchise.

Many have defended Marvel in the wake of the comments, though, including directors Taika Waititi and James Gunn.

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There have been more stars who have also sided with the opinion of Scorsese, though: Robert Downey Jr said he “respects [Scorsese’s] opinion on the topic, and Friends star Jennifer Aniston says she thinks Marvel is “diminishing” the film industry.

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