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‘The Death Of Stalin’ hit a bit too close to home for David Cameron

"He could barely contain his surprise and horror and joy."

David Cameron’s reaction to The Death Of Stalin has been revealed.

The film is the latest production by satire heavyweight Armando Iannucci, creator of The Thick Of It and Veep.

The former Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative party told the film’s actor Jason Isaacs, who plays soviet war hero Georgy Zhukov, that the film’s plotline hit a bit too close to home.

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“I was talking to David Cameron and when I told him what I was doing, he could barely contain his surprise and horror and joy at how the film’s story paralleled exactly what was going on in Downing Street,” Isaacs told The Guardian.

“He was watching Boris – having stabbed him in the back – being stabbed in the front by Gove, and then everyone else stabbing Gove until Theresa May was the last woman standing,” he continued. “The blood was fresh.”

Isaacs explained that, “There’s no message to the film, but you get from it that politicians seeking power should almost by definition be precluded from obtaining power.

“They’re all so venal and self-serving and immature and ruthless,” he added.

Elsewhere in the interview, the actor expressed that, though the film was not written with the current political climate in mind, Iannucci’s style of political satire transcends specific events or current affairs.

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“That’s Armando’s gift for political satire. You could have released this film at any time in the last 100 years… and it would seem perfectly apposite.”

The Death Of Stalin is released in cinemas across the UK today (October 20). Read our review here.

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