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Elton John’s half-brother slams Rocketman as ‘a million miles away from the truth’ about their dad

Geoff Dwight says their father Stanley wasn't homophobic

Elton John‘s half-brother Geoff Dwight has hit out at the singer for the portrayal of their father in Rocketman.

Rocketman includes scenes of Elton – played by Taron Egerton – arguing with his parents.

Elton’s father Stanley (Steven Mackintosh) is shown criticising his son for reading “women’s magazines”, fearing his son is effeminate.

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But Dwight has denied the film’s viewpoint of Stanley Dwight, saying their father wasn’t at all homophobic.

Dwight told Mail Online: “This coldness is a million miles away from what dad was like. He was a product of a time when men didn’t go around hugging each other and showing their feelings every minute of the day, but he had plenty of love in him for all of us.”

Talking about their father’s reaction to Elton coming out as gay, Dwight said: “Dad didn’t have a homophobic bone in his body. When Elton came out, dad didn’t care. He didn’t even mention it, because it wasn’t important to him.”

Stanley Dwight died in 1991. Elton – whose real name is Reg Dwight – and Geoff have only spoken once since then.

But Dwight denied there was a feud, saying: “There’s no ill feeling from me toward Elton, far from it. I love him, but our paths have gone in different directions.”

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A statement from the Rocketman production didn’t specifically comment on Dwight’s claims, but addressed how real-life people in the singer’s family are portrayed. It said: “This is Elton’s life as a musical fantasy. We set out to celebrate Elton John, creativity, imagination and wondrous possibility, not the monochrome world he was born into.”

 

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