EU to cut “disproportionate” amount of British TV and film post-Brexit

It's said that the UK's output could currently "hinder a larger variety of European works"

The EU is planning on scrapping a “disproportionate” amount of British TV and film content shown in Europe after Brexit.

An EU document tabled with diplomats, seen by The Guardian, explained that in the “aftermath of Brexit” quotas will be reevaluated as to reduce “disproportionate” amount of British programming.

The UK is currently Europe’s biggest producer of film and TV programming, with the EU’s audiovisual media services directive now saying European content must make up at least 30 per cent of titles available on demand instead.

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“The high availability of UK content in video on demand services, as well as the privileges granted by the qualification as European works, can result in a disproportionate presence of UK content within the European video on demand quota and hinder a larger variety of European works (including from smaller countries or less spoken languages),” a leaked paper distributed among the member states reportedly reads.

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CREDIT: Getty Images

“Therefore the disproportionality may affect the fulfilment of the objectives of promotion of European works and cultural diversity aimed by the audiovisual media services directive.”

An impact study looking at the risk of the EU’s “cultural diversity” from British programming is also set to be launched by the European Commission in order to readdress the balance.

Adam Minns, the executive director of the Commercial Broadcasters Association (COBA), said in a statement: “Selling the international intellectual property rights to British programmes has become a crucial part of financing production in certain genres, such as drama.

“Losing access to a substantial part of EU markets would be a serious blow for the UK TV sector, right across the value chain from producers to broadcasters to creatives.”

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Meanwhile, over 200 artists have come together for the new #LetTheMusicMove campaign, which calls upon the UK government to take action over the government’s failure to negotiate visa-free travel and Europe-wide work permits for musicians and crew in their post-Brexit deal.

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