Golden Globes: Sacha Baron Cohen roasts Mark Zuckerberg with “Nazi propaganda” joke

Ouch.

Sacha Baron Cohen hit out at Mark Zuckerberg during his appearance at the Golden Globes, accusing the Facebook boss of “spreading Nazi propaganda”.

Taking to the stage to introduce Jojo Rabbit, which was nominated for Best Picture (Comedy or Musical), the Borat comic made a barbed reference about the billionaire social media mogul.
“The hero of this next movie is a naive, misguided child who spreads Nazi propaganda and only has imaginary friends,” Baron Cohen said. “His name is Mark Zuckerberg.”


Feigning confusion at the card he was reading, Baron Cohen then clarified: “Oh wait, this is old and from The Social Network” – a reference to David Fincher’s 2010 movie about Facebook’s founding days.

Advertisement

Baron-Cohen’s latest attack on Zuckerberg comes after he appeared at the Anti Defamation League’s International Leadership Awards in November 2019. He used his speech at the time to criticise social media for heightening discrimination.

“All this hate and violence is being facilitated by a handful of internet companies that amount to the greatest propaganda machine in history,” he said.

“Think about it. Facebook, YouTube and Google, Twitter and others – they reach billions of people. The algorithms these platforms depend on deliberately amplify the type of content that keeps users engaged – stories that appeal to our baser instincts and that trigger outrage and fear.”

Meanwhile, 1917 emerged as the big winner at last night’s Golden Globes – as Sam Mendes’ war epic picked up a slew of awards including Best Motion Picture (Drama) and Best Director for Mendes.

On the small screen, there were also major wins for Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s acclaimed Fleabag.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Terry Gilliam: “We’re doomed – what is going on with the world?”

The brain behind some of cinema's craziest epics talks climate change, Adolf Hitler, Brexit Britain – and getting his big break with Terry Jones

Courteeners’ Liam Fray: “The band is my life. When it’s not going great, my life’s not going great”

Fray on the road through darkness that led to new album 'More. Again. Forever.'

Savages’s Jehnny Beth tells us how David Bowie and ‘Peaky Blinders’ shaped her wild solo album

"In my core I felt that there was something that I hadn’t done yet – and that was this record"
Advertisement