‘IT’ director Andy Muschietti set to remake werewolf film ‘The Howling’ for Netflix

Killer clowns are out, werewolves are in

Andy Muschietti, the director behind the recent film adaptations of Stephen King’s IT, has announced that he will be directing a remake of of cult horror film The Howling for Netflix.

Speaking to That Hashtag Show, Muschietti confirmed he’ll be rebooting the werewolf film, as well as revealing that shooting will begin on the movie version of The Flash for DC this year too.

The original 1981 version of The Howling follows television journalist Karen White, who is traumatised while aiding the police in their arrest of a serial murderer. While undergoing therapy, her colleague investigates the bizarre circumstances surrounding her shock.

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Watch the original trailer below:

It was originally reported last summer (July 3) that Muschietti was in talks to direct the long-awaited full-length movie version of The Flash.

A report by The Hollywood Reporter suggested that the director will work alongside screenwriter Christina Hodson, who wrote Bumblebee and Suicide Squad spin-off Birds of Prey.

Ezra Miller is also still set to be involved. Slated to play lead character The Fastest Man Alive, the star even presented his own script to Warner Bros for the adaptation. It was rejected back in May, but he looks set to remain in the lead role regardless.

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Muschietti has also stated that while there was “nothing on the table” at present, he wouldn’t rule out another Pennywise sequel following the conclusion of IT: Chapter Two.

“There is a whole mythology to the book though,” he told io9 in August last year. “Mythology is something that always has opportunities to explore. It has been on Earth for millions of years. [Pennywise has] been in contact with humans for hundreds of years, every 27 years. So you can imagine the amount of material.

“It’s always exciting to think of eventually exploring this mythology. It’s very exciting.”

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