Quentin Tarantino would cast Adam Driver as ‘Rambo’ in his dream “good movie”

He wants to adapt the novel of ‘First Blood’

Quentin Tarantino has revealed how he’d create a guaranteed “good movie” audiences will enjoy, and it involves casting Adam Driver as Rambo.

The 57-year-old director intends to retire after his tenth film, with speculation rife on how he’ll follow up Once Upon A Time In Hollywood starring Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio.

Speaking on The Big Ticket podcast, Tarantino offered some potential perspective on his mindset heading into his final film, explaining how he’d adapt David Morrell’s 1972 novel of ‘First Blood’ if he decided to just make a “good movie”.

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“When David O. Russell talked about doing The Fighter, he was over himself and over being the auteur,” Tarantino said. “He just wanted to make a good movie that people are going to enjoy.

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Brad Pitt Tarantino Leonardo DiCaprio
Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio in ‘Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood’ (Picture: Press)

“There was something really refreshing about him saying that, and that perspective. If I just wanted to make a good movie, that I knew would be good, I would take David Morrell’s novel for First Blood and do the novel. Not the movie that was made out of First Blood. I would do the novel.

“Kurt Russell would play the sheriff, and [Adam Driver] would play Rambo. Every time I read it, the dialogue is so fantastic in the David Morrell novel that you’re reading it out loud.”

It seems like this won’t be the premise of his final film however, adding: “It would be so good. But now I want to do more than that. But if it was just about to make a good movie, that’s out there.”

It’s unclear what direction Tarantino will take for his final bow, although the director admitted recently how he considered doing a reboot of his first film, Reservoir Dogs.

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Speaking about why he plans to retire, Tarantino said: “I know film history and from here on in, filmmakers do not get better.

“Don Siegel – if he had quit his career in 1979, when he did Escape from Alcatraz, what a final film! What a mic drop. But he dribbles away with two more other ones, he doesn’t mean it.”

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