‘Halo Infinite’ developers promise no “complex DRM” on PC

No complex DRM, proper ultra-wide support, and the ability to set a minimum FPS were highlighted

A recently released video from 343 Industries highlights plenty of the features coming to Halo Infinite on PC later this year.

Releasing across Xbox consoles and PC on December 8, the game aims to highlight Microsoft’s commitment to a interconnected ecosystem between all methods of play. In the video below, one of the major things highlighted for the game on PC was that 343 is committing to having no complex Digital Rights Management (DRM) in the game.

Advertisement

Principal software engineer Michael VanKuipers said that the team “made a commitment early on that we don’t want to have any complex DRM or anything that’s going to inhibit a player’s ability to play the way they want to play.

“We’re going to continue to evolve it,” VanKuipers added, “into whatever’s necessary and whatever our players need to have a fair experience.”

An Inside Infinite blog post from April of this year highlighted this commitment to DRM, as producer on Halo Infinite Jeff Guy said that the team was “making sure our game plays nice with specific families of hardware or fighting hard to ensure we don’t add intrusive DRM to our game.”

Halo Infinite multiplayer
Halo Infinite. Credit: 343 Industries

VanKuipers added in the same post that the team’s “anti-cheat philosophy is to make cheating more difficult in ways that don’t involve kernel drivers or background services. We’ve done a lot of work securing the Slipspace engine and developing novel ways to protect and change the game to slow down cheat development.

“When people do cheat,” they added, “we’re focused on catching them through their behaviour and not from data that we’ve harvested from their machines. Combating cheaters is an ever-evolving arms race, but we’re making the tech investments needed today to continue the fight for years to come.”

Advertisement

DRM is used to protect the copyrights of digital media, and it’s notorious for tanking performance of games it’s tied to on PC. Just recently the 2016 reboot of Hitman was reviewed bombed on GOG for including DRM, as GOG highlights that it offers a “selection of great DRM-free games”.

Other highlights from the video include the ability to set a minimum FPS on the PC version of the game, ultra-wide support that focuses on enabling extra screen on the sides instead of losing it on the top and bottom, and even triple key bindings.

In other news, the eFootball 2022 patch slated for late October has now been moved to “early November” according to Konami.

Advertisement
Advertisement