Minecraft music festival: Diplo, A-Trak, Claptone and more to feature

Over 300 artists to be announced in the line-up

Electronic music production company Rave Family has announced its inaugural Minecraft music festival Electric Blockaloo, happening from 25-28 June, featuring over 300 artists in the line-up.

With some of the biggest names in the electronic dance music sphere, Electric Blockaloo is said to “define what a festival will look like in 2020” – in reference to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, which has shaken up the live music event industry. Artists that have been announced in the line-up include Diplo, A-Trak, Claude VonStroke, ZHU, Claptone and many more.

Electric Blockaloo
Credit: Rave Family

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According to Rave Family, Electric Blockaloo will feature a 60/40 revenue split with the artists, allowing the them to monetise their own ticket sales. Artists will be provided a link they can share with their fans, with which they can in turn purchase tickets through.

Both the java and Bedrock versions of Minecraft will be supported, so that means attendees can access Electric Blockaloo via mobile phones, PC, Mac, PlayStation, Xbox, Nintendo Switch and VR. For those unfamiliar with Minecraft, Rave Family will be hosting a training camp in the lead up to the festival. Here, players and attendees will learn how to navigate, swim, shop and socialise in the Minecraft universe.

“Electric Blockaloo is a place where artists and fans can come together, create shared musical experiences, and reconnect with each other in an immersive way,” said event founder Jackie McGuire. “It’s also much more environmentally friendly than traditional festivals, and a portion of each ticket will help support Bye Bye Plastic, an amazing organization that aims to eliminate single-use plastic from music festivals by 2025.”

This isn’t the first event of its kind. Last week saw the second attempt at Block By Blockwest, a Minecraft music festival featuring the likes of Grandson, Idles, Pussy Riot, The Wrecks and Sir Sly. It was originally planned for April 25 as reported by Patrick Clarke on NME, but it proved so popular that it crashed the organisers’ servers, forcing its postponement.

 

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