Tango Gameworks’ Shinji Mikami wants to make non-horror games

"I hope to eventually change the image that Tango Gameworks currently has”

Tango Gameworks founder Shinji Mikami has said that he wants the studio to move away from the horror genre in the future.

In a new Famitsu interview (translated by VGC), Mikami shared his thoughts on the studio following the recent launch of Ghostwire: Tokyo, saying he wants to make non-horror games in the future.

“I hope to eventually change the image that Tango Gameworks currently has,” Mikami said. “At the moment, we are still seen as a studio that specialises only in survival horror.”

Advertisement

Mikami has previously worked on big horror titles and is best known for being the series director on Resident Evil. Still, he stated that he wishes Tango Gameworks to move away from that genre.

GhostWire: Tokyo. Credit: Tango Gameworks.
GhostWire: Tokyo. Credit: Tango Gameworks.

“Of course, it’s nice to have fans think of us as a studio with a reputation for developing survival horror games,” he added. “But we also want to be viewed as a studio that can create a wider variety of games. We will be releasing more and more new games in the future, starting with Ghostwire: Tokyo, so please give us your support.”

Shinji Mikami also stated that he doesn’t believe Ghostwire: Tokyo is a horror game, saying, “Some people may feel that Ghostwire: Tokyo has a bit of a horror feel to it. But make no mistake, Ghostwire: Tokyo is not a horror game. It is an arcade-style action-adventure game.”

“Even if I explained it like that, you might still be thinking, ‘No, after The Evil Within series?’ But it’s pure action, as you freely explore a deserted Tokyo while defeating enemies.”

Mikami also touched on an upcoming game from The Evil Within 2 director John Johanas, saying that it isn’t a horror game, saying it’s “the complete opposite of horror. It’s a really good game, so keep your eyes peeled.”

Advertisement

In other news, Jason Slama, the director of the new Witcher game, has shared his thoughts on crunch culture at CD Projekt Red.

Advertisement
Advertisement