The Bible arrives in “kinetic novel” form on Steam

It also includes a trivia section to "test the knowledge of any who think they truly know the Scriptures"

The Bible is now available on Steam, allowing users to listen to passages in audiobook form with an original soundtrack.

The “digital recreation” of the historic texts, which also features trivia, is described on the Steam website as “The Bible in kinetic novel form”.

The game description reads: “Each book and story can be read in any order, and any passage can be saved and revisited later for study. This digital recreation includes an original soundtrack; and a wonderful audiobook presentation from beginning to end.

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“A Trivia section has been added to test the knowledge of any who think they truly know the Scriptures. If you find yourself getting more wrong than you’d expect dive further into the text and find the answers for yourself!”

It continues that users can leave the audio running while minimised, to absorbed during work, study or relaxing. “It’s here to be enjoyed and studied as a seamless and unobtrusive experience.”

The digital texts are based on the New King James Version of the Bible, and is currently on offer for a discounted price of £7.63 until November 22.

Elsewhere, Steam’s new pricing recommendation tool recently suggested price hikes in all countries.

According to Valve, “developers on Steam have control over their own prices, in every currency. But researching and determining ideal prices for dozens of different currencies can be a challenge for some developers,” which is where their new price recommendation tool comes in.

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The service “offers a recommendation for all other currencies, based on whatever USD price you choose,” Valve explained. “Rather than just pegging prices to foreign exchange rates, our process for price suggestions goes deeper into the nuts and bolts of what players pay for the goods and services in their lives.”

“We think it’s a helpful guide,” Valve continued. “But with purchasing power and foreign exchange rates constantly evolving, we needed to make significant changes to those conversion recommendations to stay current.”

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