‘The Last Of Us’ standalone multiplayer spin-off may be free to play

Naughty Dog is hiring someone with “proven experience in a production role supporting a AAA, free to play, live title”

It looks like the upcoming The Last Of Us multiplayer title may be a free-to-play game, with Naughty Dog looking to hire someone with proven experience in that field.

The standalone, multiplayer game is set within the The Last Of Us universe and, according to Naughty Dog’s co-president Neil Druckmann, is due to be unveiled next year.

Not much is known about the as-of-yet-untitled game but according to a new job listing at Naughty Dog, it may be a free-to-play title.

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Naughty Dog is currently hiring a live ops Producer (via Reddit) with the studio “looking for the right candidate to get in early and help define the processes, requirements, and infrastructure that will support the project through launch and beyond.

According to the post, a bonus skill would be “proven experience in a production role supporting a AAA, free to play, live title.”

The Last Of Us Part 2
The Last Of Us Part 2. Credit: Naughty Dog

While The Last Of Us isn’t specifically mentioned, Druckmann has said that the multiplayer title is at least as big as any Naughty Dog single player game while rumours suggest the title will be “very very live servicey” (via Gamesradar). The listing also says that Naughty Dog needs someone with a “deep understanding of the complexities of live game operations and a track record of building processes to help the team achieve their highest potential.”

According to Druckmann, the team decided to make the upcoming multiplayer title a standalone game after two years of development and work on it, with Druckmann saying the project “exceeded their initial expectations.”

A TV adaptation of The Last Of Us starring Pedro Pascal and Bella Ramsey is due for release in 2023.

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In other news, Valve has unveiled a new pricing recommendation tool for Steam developers but it could see players in certain countries paying up to 454 per cent more for a game.

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