Trainwrecks accuses EA of being “corrupt” after ban from ‘Apex Legends’ tournament

He said to EA: “the real gamble was done by you when you paid me 150K for four hours of Apex”

Twitch streamer Tyler “Trainwrecks” Niknam has responded to his alleged ban from Nicholas “Nickmercs” Kolcheff’s Apex Legends tournament, which was apparently due to gambling concerns.

The $50,000 (roughly £36,000) tournament is hosted by Kolcheff in association with both EA and developer Respawn Entertainment, and has a whole host of streamers involved. As reported by Dexerto, Kolcheff said on a stream that it was because EA told his own manager that “they don’t want [Trainwrecks] involved. Point blank, period.”

Kolcheff added that he assumed this was because of what Niknam does on stream, which includes gambling based content. You can find the clip here.

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Taking a look at Trainwrecks’ own Twitch account shows streams of him playing different games on the same broadcast, like Apex Legends and some gambling based slot type titles as well.

Apex Legends. Credit: Respawn Entertainment

Since the statement from Kolcheff, Niknam has responded via his Twitter account, saying EA “just told nickmercs I can’t play in his EA sponsored Apex tournament because of my gambling streams”.

He then added in another tweet (which you can see below): “hey EA you corrupt shady fucks, the real gamble was done by you when you paid me 150K for four hours of Apex, a game no one gives a fuck about me playing, I’ll sponsor nicks tourney for double what you offer you virtue signalling FIFA pack gambling fucks.”

Since Niknam’s statement, there has been no response from EA, but the company has come under fire again recently for its own loot box practises in games like FIFA, as it claimed that nine out of ten FUT packs are bought with non-purchasable coins. Despite this, many still see the feature as incredibly similar to gambling, but for young children.

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Even an ex-UKIE chair came out recently to say that video game companies should self-regulate loot boxes, as the connection to problem gambling spirals out of control.

In other news, hacker Gary Bowser has pleaded guilty to two charges involving Nintendo ROM hacking, and offered the company £3.2million ($4.5million USD).

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