Twitch is reportedly losing streamers due to offering “lowball” contracts

Twitch is reportedly offering less cash for the same amount of work

Multiple former Twitch employees have shared that big name streamers are leaving the site due to the livestreaming platform offering lower-paid contracts than it once did.

Speaking to Washington Post, former Twitch employees – who chose to remain anonymous – have shared that Twitch is deliberately offering streamers less money, causing several big names to leave for competing streaming platforms.

At the end of August (August 30), Ben ‘DrLupo’ Lupo announced that he was moving to stream exclusively with YouTube. Just a couple of days later (September 2), TimTheTatMan similarly announced that he was leaving behind Twitch and had signed a YouTube-exclusive deal.

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One anonymous Twitch employee claimed that the company is deliberately offering less money for the same amount of work, specifically adding that Lupo was “lowballed” by the platform. Twitch is allegedly offering less because it is more comfortable in its position as an industry leader, and feels like it does not need to offer as many significantly-priced contracts to retain viewership.

In Lupo’s case, this would have meant streaming at Twitch for the same amount of time but for less money, while YouTube reportedly offered a much larger cash deal that required less streams.

Solicitor Ryan Morrison, who represents multiple Twitch streamers, also confirmed to Washington Post that Twitch is offering fewer exclusive contracts. Morrison further adds that outside of North America, the platform is offering “just about none at all” and confirms that Twitch contracts are “not where it once was”.

In other news, reinstated Paradox CEO Fredrik Wester has apologised for his “inappropriate behaviour” in a conference back in 2018. Aiming to “shed light” on the situation as “transparency comes from the top”, Wester said “I sincerely regret making a person in my proximity uncomfortable and for the damage this caused.”

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