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An asteroid has been named after Brian Eno

Brian Eno attends Starmus V: A Giant Leap Official Opening, sponsored by Kaspersky at Samsung Hall on June 24, 2019 in Zurich, Switzerland

Credit: Harold Cunningham/Getty Images for Kaspersky

That's far out, man

Brian Eno has received the honour of having an asteroid named after him.

The ambient music pioneer, known for his solo career and his work with Roxy Music, was on Monday (June 24) presented with the Stephen Hawking Medal for Science Communication at the prestigious science festival, Starmus V. It was for his contribution to the popularisation of science.

In addition, a Southwest Research Institute astronomer named Marc Buie – in association with the International Astronomical Union and the Minor Planet Centre – today (June 26) named a new asteroid after Eno [via Consequence of Sound].

The asteroid was originally called ‘81948 (2000 OM69)’ but is now titled called ‘Eno’ (rather than the musician’s full name: Brian Peter George St John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno).

Eno is marking the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing by reissuing his seminal ‘Apollo: Atmospheres & Soundtracks’. Furthermore, his new album, ‘For All Mankind’, is paired with the release.

Both of Eno’s records are released on July 19 via UMC.

Brian Eno

In other news, Eno joined dozens of other musicians in signing an open letter against BBC Radio cuts.

In March, it was confirmed that BBC Radio 3 would undergo major changes, including the axing of two jazz shows and the popular experimental music show Late Junction being reduced from three nights a week to one.

Jarvis Cocker, Peter Gabriel, Mogwai’s Stuart Braithwaite, Hot Chip’s Alexis Taylor and Radiohead’s Ed O’Brien and Phil Selway also signed the letter.