Beyoncé wins legal battle to trademark Blue Ivy’s name

Her claim had previously been contested by events planner Veronica Morales

Beyoncé is closer to trademarking the name of her daughter Blue Ivy, after U.S. authorities dismissed a challenge to the application.

The singer has been in a legal battle with Veronica Morales, the owner of events planning firm Blue Ivy Company, since 2017. At the time, Beyoncé filed legal papers that sought to protect the commercial rights to ‘Blue Ivy Carter’ – her daughter with husband Jay-Z.

Contesting the claim, Morales said the trademark would be too similar to her own company and called on U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officials to deny the bid. At one point, she even accused Beyonce of fraud and said the singer had no intention of using the name for business purposes.

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Beyoncé
Beyoncé. CREDIT: Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

However, her claims have now been denied by authorities, who have ruled that there is no evidence to suggest that members of the public would confuse the two brands.

They declared, as The Blast reports: “Because we find Opposer failed to establish that Applicant lacked a bona fide intent to use its mark in connection with the goods and services identified in the application, her fraud claim based thereon… fails as well.”

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is now expected to officially grant Beyoncé’s trademark.

Last week, Beyonce launched a new fund to give Black-owned businesses grants through her BeyGOOD foundation.

The fund has been started in collaboration with the National Association For The Advancement Of Colored People (NAACP).

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The Black-Owned Small Business Impact Fund will provide grants of $10,000 (£7,923) for business owners “in select cities to help sustain business during this time”.

Beyoncé launched the BeyGOOD foundation in 2013 “to inspire people to be kind, to be charitable and to #BeyGood to themselves, to others, to the community, and to our world”.

In April, the star donated $6million (£4.8m) to coronavirus relief efforts through the foundation and a partnership with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s #startsmall initiative. The money was used to help communities of colour and organisations within them as the coronavirus pandemic spread across the US.

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