Bonehead asks Liam Gallagher for Oasis reunion: “We really should get back together”

Paul Arthurs was speaking as part of Tim Burgess' album party on '(What's The Story) Morning Glory'

Former Oasis guitarist Paul ‘Bonehead’ Arthurs has publicly asked former bandmate Liam Gallagher to revive the Britpop heavyweights.

Tweeting during a listening party for the band’s 1995 classic album ‘(What’s The Story) Morning Glory’, Bonehead said: “We really should get back together. What you saying @liamgallagher.”

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The event was one of Charlatans frontman Tim Burgess’ ongoing series of online album listening parties. 

As with a playback of ‘Definitely Maybe’ last week, Bonehead was on hand throughout to share untold stories from the album’s creation as he listened back.

Among his tales were that Liam originally dismissed ‘Wonderwall’ as a “shit reggae song” when he first heard it.

He also revealed that the first time Noel Gallagher played ‘Champagne Supernova’ he was brought to tears. “Noel first played us this on the back lounge of the tour bus in the USA on acoustic. I cried.”

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He also recalled an inner-band feud which left Liam with a broken arm, arising during the recording of ‘Don’t Look Back In Anger’ (for which he “nicked” the piano part from John Lennon’s ‘Imagine’).

“Noel lost the plot and kicked off with Liam, think you all know the story. Studio trashed, baseball bats on heads. Air rifles locked in cupboards to save deaths. Dustbins thrown through the hire car windows. Band split up. new drummer in bits. Think Liam ended up with a broken arm.”

Of fan-favourite ‘Bonehead’s Bank Holiday’, meanwhile, on which he took lead vocals, Bonehead said that Noel wanted the track to become “our Octopus’s Garden”, in reference to the Ringo Starr-led Beatles track.

Tim Burgess launched his Twitter listening parties with a playback of his band’s debut ‘Some Friendly’, followed by Franz Ferdinand detailing their debut, Blur drummer Dave Rowntree reminiscing over ‘Parklife’ (with interjections from Graham Coxon and Stephen Street) and more.

“It’s multi-dimensional, it can soothe and it can help your mental health and it can take to somewhere else that these days aren’t allowing you to go to. I’ve not seen that many [livestreamed acoustic gigs], it’s not really for me but I’m supportive of it all really,” Burgess told NME.

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