DJ found guilty of groping Taylor Swift says pop star “ruined” his life

David Mueller is still working in radio despite last year's verdict

Radio host David Mueller has said that Taylor Swift “ruined” his life, almost a year after he was found guilty of groping the pop star.

Swift accused Mueller of touching her inappropriately at a concert in 2013 – claiming that he reached up her skirt and grabbed her buttock in public. Though he denied the allegation, the presenter lost his job as a result. Mueller then sued the singer, before she countersued. In August last year, Mueller was found guilty of assault and battery.

With Mueller still working on radio, the host was asked by Radar Online what he would say to Swift now. “How can you live with yourself?” he replied. “You ruined my life.”

Maintaining his innocence, he added that there was no sexual misconduct on his part. “I was not ready for the photograph,” he said. “I admit it was awkward but I never grabbed her. It’s not even close to what happened.”

Mueller said that he is now “afraid to even talk to women”. “I feel like I’m in a prison. I’m not myself anymore.

“I don’t even go near women. It makes me upset. I was always the gentleman. I would always say, ‘Hey, watch your language, there’s a lady here,’ and then I get accused of this.”

Taylor Swift fans

Taylor Swift

Mueller described himself as “just a regular guy” and is happy that he still works on the air. “I don’t have a lot of listeners but if I can keep doing radio then I’ll consider myself a lucky guy,” he said.

For the stand Swift took in her court battle, she was listed as one of ‘The Silence Breakers’ who blew the whistle on systemic sexual assault. She was honoured alongside Tarana Burke, Ashley Judd, Susan Fowler, Adama Iwu, Isabel Pascual, Terry Crews, Rose McGowan and more.

The ‘reputation’ star was also named as one of Time Magazine‘s ‘People Of The Year 2018’. Speaking to the publication, Swift shared a message with her fans following the ordeal.

“I would tell people who find themselves in this situation that there is a great deal of blame placed on the victims in cases of sexual harassment and assault,” she said. “You could be blamed for the fact that it happened, for reporting it and blamed for how you reacted. You might be made to feel like you’re overreacting, because society has made this stuff seem so casual.

“You should not be blamed for waiting 15 minutes or 15 days or 15 years to report sexual assault or harassment, or for the outcome of what happens to a person after he or she makes the choice to sexually harass or assault you.”