Dave Grohl: ‘Computers have made people forget what it’s like to rock out’

Foo Fighters frontman admits that his band struggle in a digitised world

Dave Grohl has posited his theory that people have “forgotten how to rock out” because they spend too long on their computers.

The Foo Fighters frontman was asked by Red Bull if his band struggle in a digital world, to which he claimed that no advances in technology will ever replace the feel of recording a song with a live band for him.

“People have forgotten what it’s like to really rock out because they spend all day in front of a freakin’ computer, which they hail as the new god,” he said. “And they seriously think technology can make them rich, if they stumble on something new. But I’m telling you: technology might make you rich, yet it will never make you happy.”

Grohl went on to add to his theory, stating: “They’re two different things light years apart. Happiness or luck or a good feeling – whatever you want to call it – is based on interaction among humans, on making other people happy, giving them something dear to their heart. Music is a perfect medium for that. What could be more human than writing a song with bass, drums and guitars? That’s as feel-based as it gets.”

An Interactive Guide To Foo Fighters’ Sonic Highways: 8 Cities, 8 Songs, 8 Stories

Foo Fighters recently announced plans for a 2015 tour of the UK, set to take place in May and June of next year, with a open window to appear at Worthy Farm for Glastonbury, which will take place between June 24 and 28. They will play Sunderland Stadium Of Light on May 25, Manchester Emirates Old Trafford on May 27, London’s Wembley Stadium on June 19 and 20 and Edinburgh Murrayfield Stadium on June 23. Tickets go on general sale at 10am on November 21.

Meanwhile, drummer Taylor Hawkins has revealed that he thinks new album ‘Sonic Highways’ is as close to being perfect as the band could have possibly made it.

Speaking to NME about the album, which was released on November 10, in the video below, Hawkins says: “We like the way our band sounds, naturally. I want drums to sound like drums, as opposed to a drum machine. We kept it as humanly perfect as possible but nothing more. It’s as perfect as we can be, which is not perfect.”

See below to watch now.
https://link.brightcove.com/services/player/?bctid=3872247196001