Hear Lemmy pay tribute to AC/DC in unheard interview: “We’re like birds of a feather”

The posthumous interview appears on the 'AC/DC Beyond The Thunder' podcast

A posthumous interview with late Motörhead frontman Lemmy has appeared online, which sees the legend paying tribute to AC/DC.

The new interview, recorded back in 2015, appears as the new season opener of the AC/DC Beyond The Thunder podcast.

The previously unheard interview sees Lemmy recounting his memories of the Australian hard rock band, including a story of how he tried to impress a date by bringing her backstage at an AC/DC gig.

Advertisement

“AC/DC are a rock and roll band; they’re like us,” he said of his peers. “We don’t play metal. AC/DC don’t play metal. We’re like birds of a feather.”

Lemmy went on to discuss how “AC/DC have become an international event,” unlike his own band, whose success was mostly confined to the United Kingdom.

Previous guests on the podcast have included Guns N’ Roses guitarist Slash, and baseball star Trevor Hoffman, who famously walked out to bat to the soundtrack of AC/DC’s ‘Hells Bells’.

Earlier this year, AC/DC fans broke a Guinness World Record after nearly 4000 people played air guitar to ‘Highway To Hell’.

It came as part of a festival in the band’s hometown of Perth, Australia, which was held on the 40th anniversary of founding band member Bon Scott’s death, and featured a rolling AC/DC tribute gig which travelled along the Canning Highway in Western Australia, the motorway Scott would travel down regularly in his youth, which has come to be known as the “real-life Highway to Hell”.

Advertisement

Last month, it was revealed that a Lemmy biopic is reportedly in the works. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Kilmister’s early, pre-Motörhead life will be explored in the film, which is set to be helmed by Greg Olliver, who directed a 2010 documentary on the late star.

“We’ve been carefully developing this biopic since 2013, making sure to stay true to Lemmy, Motörhead band members Phil Campbell and Mikkey Dee, and all the other folks that played important roles in Lemmy’s life,” Olliver explained in a statement.

Advertisement
Advertisement