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Iggy Azalea criticises Azealia Banks in long Twitter rant

Azalea responds to claims made by Banks in a new radio interview

Iggy Azalea has accused Azealia Banks of having a “piss poor attitude” after Banks gave an interview in which she claimed white artists are appropriating black culture in America.

Banks has clashed with Azalea numerous times in recent months, most recently when she chastised her Australian rival for not commenting on the protests in New York and Ferguson following Eric Garner and Michael Brown’s deaths.

She returned to this subject again in a new interview with Hot 97’s Ebro in the Morning (via Billboard) in which she became visibly emotional when talking about how she feels white artists are treated differently to black artists in America.

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“I feel like, in this country, whenever it comes to our things, like black issues or black politics or black music or whatever, there’s always this undercurrent of kinda like a ‘Fuck you,'” Banks said. “There’s always a ‘Fuck y’all niggas. Y’all don’t really own shit. Y’all don’t have shit.’ That Macklemore album wasn’t better than the Drake record. That Iggy Azalea shit isn’t better than any fucking black girl that’s rapping today.”

Adding: “Until y’all motherfuckers ready to talk about what you owe me…at the very fucking least you owe me my identity and to not exploit that shit.”

Azalea then responded on Twitter, issuing a message to Banks via her 3.5 m followers. The full set of tweets, in which Banks is labelled “poisonous” and a “bigot”, can be read below.

In November Banks spoke to NME about her very public series of celebrity spats, saying that she is “done with that” now and wants to “hang up [her] fighting gloves”.

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