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Jake Bugg: ‘My Number One still seems a bit crazy’

Singer remembers the moment he found out he was top of the charts

Jake Bugg has admitted that his chart-topping success this year still seems “a bit crazy”.

The Nottingham singer’s self-titled debut went straight to Number One in October, dethroning Mumford and Sons‘ ‘Babel’ and beating Leona Lewis‘ ‘Glassheart’ into third place. Infamously, Bugg later remarked: “It’s my job to keep that X Factor shit off the top of the charts.”

Remembering the moment he found out that he was Number One, Bugg told NME: “I was in my hotel just chilling, actually. I was flying out to America the next day, so to hear that before I went off to America… I couldn’t believe it basically. I made a few calls but I didn’t really do anything major, because I just didn’t believe it. It still seems a bit crazy to me, even now.”

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Looking back, Bugg admitted that the “stepping stone” for his career probably came at T In The Park in July. He recalled: “It was the first time we’d played a tent that size, and it was just amazing to see everyone there. They’d come to watch me after trudging through all that horrible mud and rain; to sing my songs back at me. It’s just an incredible feeling. It was also the day that Noel [Gallagher] and The Stone Roses played, so that made it even better.”

Bugg is currently on tour in the US, but returns to the UK for a rescheduled date at Birmingham’s HMV Institute on December 18. He has just been confirmed to play a pair of Ibiza and Majorca Rocks shows next June (2013).

To read the full interview with Jake Bugg, pick up a copy of this week’s NME, which is available on newsstands or digitally now.

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