Jay-Z will use REM lyrics on new album ‘Magna Carta Holy Grail’

New song 'Heaven' lifts words from US indie veterans' 'Losing My Religion'

Jay-Z‘s new album ‘Magna Carta Holy Grail’ will use lyrics taken from REM‘s ‘Losing My Religion’.

The lyrics to the 1991 hit will feature on new song ‘Heaven’, which was revealed via Jay-Z’s Samsung app last night (June 25). The chorus of “That’s Me in the corner/That’s me in the spotlight/Losing my religion” is used repeatedly, while Jay-Z’s own lyrics include the line, “Conspiracy theorist screaming/lluminati/They can’t believe this much skill is in the human body“.

Jay-Z also uses lyrics from Nirvana’s ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ on another new album song, ‘Holy Grail’. The lyrics to the song, a collaboration with Justin Timberlake, were posted on the hip-hop mogul’s Samsung app yesterday (June 24).

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Courtney Love previously revealed that she gave Jay-Z permission to the Nirvana lyrics on his new album, but said she thought her daughter might take issue with it: “I’m letting Jay-Z use lyrics – Frances [Bean Cobain] would freak [if she knew about it]. Jay-Z’s huge and we’re friends. I mean we’re not besties or anything…”

‘Magna Carta Holy Grail’ was thought to be going platinum ahead of its proper release because of a deal made with Samsung. However a spokesperson for the Official UK Charts company told NME that music which is given away for free does not qualify towards the Official Charts. “Legitimate purchases of Jay-Z’s album will count, however, as usual,” they added. One million copies of the album will be given away for free to Samsung Galaxy smartphone users 72 hours ahead of the record’s official release on July 4.

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