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Jimmy Eat World warn new bands about the regretful way they named their band

One bad decision and one "dumb ass party" led to Jimmy Eat World

In a new Twitter thread, Jimmy Eat World have told the story of how their band got their name and warned upcoming bands about the dangers of acronyms.

Posting on Twitter, lead singer Jim Adkins, using the band’s account began: “Advice for new bands: When coming up with a band name, make sure it’s acronym displayed really large on your artwork or t shirts won’t be complicating matters. You’re welcome.”

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The thread went on to describe where the band where in February 1994, how one party invite forced the band to settle on a name and how they used one of the temporary names two of the band members used in another band. “It was brought up and we discussed it for less than 5 min, no shit, we decided to call ourselves Jimmy Eat World so we could play this dumb ass party.”

The thread concludes: “So moral of the story: even seemingly small and insignificant decisions can be much bigger than you could imagine. Slow down sometimes and make sure it’s right.”

Read the full thread below.

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One fan pointed out the complicated issue of using the acronym of Jimmy Eat World could have been solved if they’d just changed their name to ‘Jimmy Ate World’.

Speaking to NME backstage before their set on the main stage at Leeds festival last year, Jim Adkins explained that keeping up with events back home was trickier because of the time-difference, which he said merely delayed the pain. “Every day, there’s a new disgusting thing,” he added.

In November 2016, the veteran Arizona band released ‘My Enemy’, from the 30 Days, 30 Songs playlist, where a new anti-Trump song was unveiled every day until the presidential election. In it, they called out Trump’s hate-fuelled rhetoric.”

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