John Lydon opens up about becoming full-time carer for his wife with Alzheimer’s

"That person I love is still there every minute of every day and that is my life"

John Lydon has opened up about becoming a full-time carer for his wife Nora Forster, who is suffering from Alzheimer’s.

The musician has been married to Forster since 1979 and was the stepfather of her daughter, The Slits’ Ari Up, who died in 2010.

The former Sex Pistols frontman initially shared that Forster had been suffering from dementia in 2019. Speaking to The Mirror this week, he said: “Nora has Alzheimer’s… I am her full-time carer and I won’t let anyone mess up with her head.

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“For me, the real person is still there. That person I love is still there every minute of every day and that is my life. It’s unfortunate that she forgets things, well, don’t we all?”

John Lydon, Nora Forster
John Lydon and Nora Forster in 1986 CREDIT: Fin Costello/Redferns

He continued to liken her condition to a “permanent hangover.” “It gets worse and worse, bits of the brain store less and less memory and then suddenly some bits completely vanish,” he explained.

Lydon said that the couple had searched for the best experts they could find to help his wife. “It’s quite amazing as the alleged experts we have had to deal with at enormous expense have said that they have been very impressed that she never ever forgets me, we are constantly there with each other [in her mind] and that bit won’t go,” he said.

“Why pay for professionals to work on this when I think the message is a bit of love goes a long way.”

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He added that he would not put Forster in a care home, especially given the coronavirus pandemic, saying: “I am under lockdown anyway because I am her full-time carer. I don’t need to go out and socialise with buttholes.”

Meanwhile, earlier this year, Sex Pistols drummer Paul Cook discussed the possibility of a live reunion for the band. “I can’t see it happening again for the Pistols and I don’t think anyone wants it to,” he said, but did concede that there “will always be a crowd for it”.

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