Kate Tempest album artwork to go on display at National Portrait Gallery

The 'Everybody Down' cover shot forms part of the 'Picture The Poet' exhibition

The artwork for Kate Tempest‘s debut album ‘Everybody Down’ will be displayed at the National Portrait Gallery in London from next month.

The south London-born musician, poet and spoken word artist released the LP in May 2014, receiving a Mercury Prize nomination in the process. Now, the cover of Tempest’s record will be displayed at the London art gallery as part of the ‘Picture The Poet’ exhibition.

As The Guardian reports, the exhibition includes images of poets such as Carol Ann Duffy, Simon Armitage and Benjamin Zephaniah, now adding the 2013 photograph by Dav Stewart to its collection. The exhibition will also tour the UK, starting off in Lincoln on May 1.

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Kate Tempest recently told NME of her disenfranchisement with the government and a system in which “laws get shuffled through under the carpet”, saying that she is “petrified of the people in power” and that “voting does nothing” to change the political system in Britain.

“Like a lot of people, I feel petrified of the people in power,” Tempest said. “Around the Iraq War, I became involved in what I thought were the right avenues – peace movements, demos, meetings – and it was just bullshit. Nothing fucking changed.

“We live in a time that’s beyond politics. Voting does nothing – we’re completely powerless. Now, the most exciting and reliable changes that can happen are the changes within individual people. We can’t engage in a political system that doesn’t exist for us.”

Tempest has been linked to possibly working with legendary producer Rick Rubin, who was spotted with Frank Ocean at her album launch last year.
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