Kendrick Lamar’s ‘Alright’ chanted at Million Man March for racial equality

"We gonna be alright"

Kendrick Lamar‘s post-depression anthem ‘Alright’ was chanted at the ‘Justice Or Else’ Million Man March yesterday, with thousands of protesters joining in on a rendition of chorus line “we gonna be alright” in Washington.

The march took place in celebration of the 20th anniversary of the original ‘Million Man March’, and took the theme ‘Justice Or Else’. Nation of Islam leader and organiser Louis Farrakhan echoed the original calls from 1995, asking for social justice reform in America.

‘Alright’ is often interpreted as a post-depression track; a bounce back from hard times. Lamar himself has described is as being about “hope”.

J.Cole recently commented that Lamar may have the power to stop L.A. gang culture, to which Lamar replied:

“That’s a lot of responsibility. I definitely think that God put something in me that I’m not even aware of, I know it’s there and I know it has the power to not only conquer what’s going on in LA, but also a little deeper and further than that. I just don’t know when.”

#Repost @ujamaabox ・・・ Blessed for this sunny day. #justiceorelse #millionmanmarch #dc #organize #power

A photo posted by The Million Man March (@themillionmanmarch) on

The director of the video to ‘Alright’, Colin Tilley, told MTV about the thinking behind the track and video:

“I wanted to have this m.A.A.d. city concept in there first. It basically shows the state of everything that’s going on in the world right now. It’s also showing how one man can basically spread positivity through all of the madness that’s going on and how everything is gonna be alright.”

The organisers of the event talk of the march’s aims on their website, as follows:

“Justice should never look at your color. Justice should never look at your position or posture. Justice should have on one side of the scale the weight of facts and on the other side our actions in accord with those facts. When you have liberty but not justice then there is no joy in being free because the only reason that people are joyous in liberty is that there is justice coming to them in society. That is why we have courts. The purpose of the court system is that we may go to a court of law and express our grievance before an impartial jury; a jury of our peers, so that when a decision is rendered, our breast can be calm.”

Watch a Vine of the Lamar track being chanted at the Washington march below: