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KISS played a show for great white sharks in Australia – but no sharks turned up

They don't love it loud.

KISS headed to Australia to play a show for an audience of great white sharks earlier this week – unfortunately, none turned up.

The rock titans announced last month that they would be heading Down Under for the special concert. It was held as part of a promotion for Airbnb’s new Animal Experiences, a travel programme catered to animal lovers.

Gene Simmons, Eric Singer and Tommy Thayer rocked up to the coast of Port Lincoln in South Australia on Monday (November 18) to perform on a boat to eight lucky fans and members of the media.

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The performance was also broadcast via underwater speakers in the hope of attracting great whites, who are apparently partial to “low-frequency sounds of rock and roll”.

Gene Simmons
KISS’ Gene Simmons (Credit: Getty)

According to local news site ABC Eyre Peninsula, however, no sharks made an appearance during the show.

“The guys were tight, they were right into it, it was loud, there were lights, there were smoke machines,” the event’s host Matt Waller told the outlet. “It was everything that a KISS concert should be.”

KISS singer and guitarist Paul Stanley, who was ultimately forced to miss the event as he recovered from flu, previously said he was initially “a little taken aback” by the unique concept.

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“I’m not sure how much of us the sharks can take,” he joked. “I’m hoping they know ‘Rock And Roll All Nite.’”

KISS, meanwhile, are set to return to UK shores next summer for a headline appearance at Download Festival. This will be followed by further ‘End of the World’ dates across Europe.

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