Lil Pump under fire for ‘anti-Asian slurs’ in new song ‘Butterfly Doors’

He's been branded as 'racist' and 'disgusting'

Lil Pump has been criticised for using what many have deemed to be racist language in a preview of new song ‘Butterfly Doors’.

The rapper posted a teaser of the song on Instagram, featuring the lyrics “They call me [Chinese basketball player] Yao Ming cause my eyes real low,” before he continues to pull his eyes down. He later ad-libs “ching chong,” which is a derogatory term referring to the Chinese language.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Brd4-E0D-56/

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Having received millions of views, Lil Pump has now been slammed for his ‘racist’ and ‘disgusting’ language and behaviour.

Among them, Crazy Rich Asians star Awkwafina wrote in a since-deleted Tweet: “Always nice to hear a new song with a Ching Chong adlib. Guess it’s better than “eyes chink” like some other verses I’ve heard. But can we at least think of some more creative racist epithets? @lilpump.”

Other users also condemned Pump’s lyrics:

https://twitter.com/o733Rr8MAx4thbK/status/1074895687580446720

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It’s been a controversial month for the rapper, starting with him live-streaming his arrest in Denmark after giving police officers the middle-finger, before reportedly being escorted off a plane in Miami before another arrest.

The rapper was forced to cancel a show in Finland this month as a result of detainment. Earlier this year, Lil Pump was forced to cancel an upcoming tour amid legal issues surrounding his probation.

The 18-year-old ‘Gucci Gang’ rapper took to Instagram to tell followers that he “gotta go in and do a couple of months” in prison after violating the terms of his probation.

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