Listen to Death Cab For Cutie’s new song ‘Kids In ’99’ from an upcoming EP

The new release features "five new tracks that share a similar conception but different births"

Death Cab For Cutie have shared details of an upcoming five-track EP, and shared the first track from it.

The band released their latest full-length ‘Thank You For Today’ last year, and have been on tour supporting the record constantly since.

Announcing the new EP on Twitter, the band say that ‘The Blue EP’ is “a collection of five new tracks that share a similar conception but different births. We love these songs and can’t wait for you to hear them.”

The EP comes out on September 6, and its first track ‘Kids In ’99’ is streaming now. The track, as the band explain, is one of two tracks recorded with producer Peter Katis last winter. “It was our first time working with him and we are absolutely thrilled with the results. We hope you like it too,” they say. You can hear ‘Kids In ’99’ below.

Kids in ’99

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Last week, it was revealed that Death Cab frontman Ben Gibbard appears on ‘The Big Day’, the recently released debut studio album from Chance The Rapper. The band explained on Twitter how a chance encounter at Bonnaroo Festival led to the realisation that a mutual appreciation existed between the bands.

Gibbard sings on the album’s track ‘Do You Remember’.

The frontman also appears on ‘Tiny Changes’, the new album celebrating 10 years of Frightened Rabbit‘s ‘The Midnight Organ Fight’, taking on the much-loved track ‘Keep Yourself Warm’. In a four-star review, NME said he adds “the appropriate amount of grandeur” to the track.

Gibbard also recently spoke to NME about the legacy left by late Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison.

“We’ve lost a giant,” he says. “He was such an amazing writer and such an amazing human being. I think it’s been really wonderful to see in the tributes to him how much wider his music had gone than I’d ever really known. This music was as important to these people as it was to me.”