Listen to Sam Fender’s new “unorthodox love song” ‘Hypersonic Missiles’

The track comes ahead of the BRITs winner's first US tour

Sam Fender has shared his new single, ‘Hypersonic Missiles’. Scroll down to listen to it now.

The track is the Tyneside musician’s first new music of 2019 and follows recent singles ‘Dead Boys’ and ‘Play God’.

In a press release, Fender explained the name of the song was inspired by a “newly developed Russian missile that travels at something like nine times the speed of sound.”

He described the track as being “in many ways, an unorthodox love song”, saying: “Its main focus is on the world around the narrator, who is a complete tin foil hatter. They are convinced the world is on its last legs; they know that it is rife with injustice but feel completely helpless and lacking the necessary intelligence to change it while remaining hopelessly addicted to the fruits of consumerism.

Hypersonic Missiles

Hypersonic Missiles, an album by Sam Fender on Spotify

“Amongst all the chaos is love and celebration, there is this glimmer of hope that runs through the song, a little notion that no matter what happens, these two people are gonna have a fucking good time regardless of the tyrants that run their world, and regardless of the imminent doom from these ‘Hypersonic Missiles’.”

The lyrics reference bombings in Gaza, rising tensions in global politics, and “the corporate machine.” You can listen to it above now.

In December, Fender was named the latest winner of the BRITs Critics Choice Award. Next week, he will play his first North American shows, with dates in LA, Toronto, New York, and at Austin’s SXSW festival. Following that, he will embark on a European and UK tour, concluding with a sold-out hometown show at North Shields’ Tynemouth Castle.

Earlier this week, BBC Radio 1’s Annie Mac hailed Fender as “so important”. Speaking to NME, she said: “He’s a real working class guy from North Shields. He’s not your average successful artist, he’s different and I like that. He’s representative of another world outside London and I think it’s really important.”