Watch Mark Hoppus play bass for first time since cancer diagnosis

"This the first time that I’ve tried to play these songs in well over a year," said the Blink-182 musician

Mark Hoppus has shared a video of himself playing bass for the first time since being diagnosed with cancer.

The Blink-182 musician told fans in a statement last month that he had been undergoing chemotherapy, and later confirmed he’d been diagnosed with 4-A diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

Earlier this month, Hoppus provided an update in which he said that his treatment appeared to be working, saying it was “the best possible news” to have received.

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Appearing on a Twitch stream yesterday (July 26), the bassist was seen with his instrument in hand while addressing fans. He then performed Blink’s 2005 track ‘Not Now’, which appeared on the band’s ‘Greatest Hits’ album.

“Not only is this the first time that I’ve tried to play these songs in well over a year, this is the first time that I’ve felt well enough to play my bass since I was diagnosed,” Hoppus explained.

He added that “this is the first time I’ve picked up my bass in a few months, even”. You can watch the clip above.

Sharing a statement on his condition last week (July 19), Hoppus wrote: “Scans indicate that the chemo is working! I still have months of treatment ahead, but it’s the best possible news.

“I’m so grateful and confused and also sick from last week’s chemo. But the poison the doctors pump into me and the kind thoughts and wishes of people around me are destroying this cancer.”

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Hoppus, who has the same type of cancer that his mother recovered from, said in a separate message: “I’m going to beat this through chemotherapy or through bone marrow transplants, but either way I’m determined to kick cancer’s ass directly in the nuts. Love to you all. Let’s. Heckin. Go.”

As the Lymphoma Research Foundation explain, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients are diagnosed with around the globe, with 18,000 cases reported every year. It’s an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that targets white blood cells, deteriorating the body’s immune system and its ability to fight infection.

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