Massive Attack to complete European tour by train to fight climate change

"Business as usual is over"

Massive Attack have announced they will complete their European tour by train in a bid to fight climate change.

The band have been outspoken supporters for the anti-climate change movement, including activist group Extinction Rebellion.

Speaking to the BBC, singer Robert Del Naja said the band wanted to avoid flying and change how the touring lifestyle contributed to climate change. “[As musicians] we have enjoyed a high-carbon lifestyle,” he said. “But as a society we’ve all existed in a fossil-fuel economy for a long time and had very little choice in that.

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Massive Attack
Massive Attack CREDIT: Valerio Pennicino/WireImage

“The challenge now is to not only make personal sacrifices, but to insist on the systemic change that’s needed. Business as usual is over.”

It was previously reported that Massive Attack will donate four years of their tour data to a report on the music industry’s carbon footprint conducted by the University Of Manchester. The study will focus on three key areas where CO2 emissions are generated – band travel and production, audience transport, and venue.

In April 2019 Massive Attack made a surprise appearance at an Extinction Rebellion protest with 3D DJing to crowds at London’s Marble Arch. The band are also one of many artists to sign up to the Music Declares Emergency campaign, which is pushing the music industry to step up its actions in fighting climate change.

Last month, Massive Attack announced they will hold a “super-low carbon” gig in Liverpool this summer. The show will take place at an as-yet-undisclosed venue, with the date also to be confirmed. It will be held as part of The Good Business Festival, a new global organisation which seeks to bring about positive changes from businesses.

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The concert will see a “dramatic reduction” in the carbon impact of the band, their crew, transport, catering, merchandise and production, as well as in transporting the crowd to and from the concert.

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