MIA teases new anti-Trump track

'Paper Planes' singer also references Madonna and Rihanna

MIA has teased a new song which appears to take aim at Donald Trump.

The clip, which you can hear below, also references Madonna and Rihanna.

The track – ‘POWA’ – features the lyrics: Throw up my finger and I’m taking on the (Trump) Tower and Super-kala fascist racist espi-ala-tazors.

She also declares: I’m not Rihanna, I’m not Madonna, I’m not Mariah or Ariana/I’m been around in this world causing drama/The real spice girl, hot girl power.

Earlier today (February 7), the singer revealed that she will be curating this year’s Meltdown Festival.

She will oversee the annual cultural event at London’s Southbank Centre from June 9 to 18.

“For me this Meltdown will be about putting on a musical week that shows different types of music which have inspired each other to exist,” she said in a statement.

“Genres that support other genres, redefining the concept of a melting pot. Respect the history, don’t live in it. I plan to bring together music’s best forward thinkers who have contributed to all our lives. When music acts as inspiration, it’s boundary-less.”

Meltdown Festival launched at London’s Southbank Centre in 1993. Last year’s event was curated by Elbow’s Guy Garvey and previous curators have included Jarvis Cocker, Yoko Ono, David Byrne, Massive Attack, Morrissey and Anohni.

MIA released latest album ‘AIM’ last September and said repeatedly in the build-up to its release that it would be her last.

Read: MIA Final Rebellion – The Full NME Cover Interview

During an interview with NME at the time, she explained why the music industry tries her patience. “I came through the Britpop era,” she said. “Then there was this turn-of-the-millennium era which I was part of, and then you’ve got this weird era where everything’s been corporatised to the max and you’re only allowed five, 10 pop star brands, who are as corporate as Sky TV… It just needs a little bit of rewriting.”

She added: “I just need time away from it. I don’t want to change how I think creatively, to brand myself into an acceptable brand.”