MySpace has lost every song uploaded to the site between 2003-15

"RIP my awful, awful teenage music."

MySpace has been criticised after the site confirmed that it has lost every bit of music uploaded between 2003-15.

Despite dwindling popularity, the once popular site used to be a major platform for emerging acts to host their music, with over 50 million songs from 14 million artists being uploaded during the 12 year period.

It also played a significant role in launching the careers of Kate Nash, Arctic Monkeys and Klaxons – who all uploaded some of their earliest music to the platform.

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But a year after the music links on MySpace stopped working, the site now says that the huge backlog of files were lost during a server migration project.

“As a result of a server migration project, any photos, videos, and audio files you uploaded more than three years ago may no longer be available on or from Myspace,” a statement from MySpace confirmed.

“We apologize for the inconvenience and suggest that you retain your back up copies. If you would like more information, please contact our Data Protection Officer, Dr. Jana Jentzsch at DPO@myspace.com.”

Posting on Twitter, TechExpert Andy Baio said: “MySpace accidentally lost all the music uploaded from its first 12 years in a server migration, losing over 50 million songs from 14 million artists.”

He added: “I’m deeply skeptical this was an accident. Flagrant incompetence may be bad PR, but it still sounds better than “we can’t be bothered with the effort and cost of migrating and hosting 50 million old MP3s.”

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Reacting to the news, another user said: “Rip my awful, awful teenage music.”

“Myspace lost over 10 years worth of everyone’s uploaded music. Don’t put your work into lobster traps, people,” said another.

Despite a huge drop in popularity, a 2015 estimation suggested that MySpace still boasts some 50 million users every year.

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