Neil Young covers Bob Dylan in political new edition of Fireside Sessions

Featuring protest songs from across Young's career

Neil Young has brought back his Fireside Sessions series for a sixth episode, sharing a deeply political new episode.

Performing from his porch instead of the usual position next to his fireplace, Young shared a number of protest songs from across his career, as well as a cover of Bob Dylan‘s ‘The Times They Are A-Changin”.

During the set, Young played ‘Alabama’ from his ‘Harvest’ album before taking on Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young protest song ‘Ohio’, as well as a rarity called ‘Campaigner’ and his song ‘Southern Man’.

Advertisement

He then went on to cover the Dylan classic, before sharing a version of his own track ‘Lookin’ For A Leader’, editing the lyrics to criticise Donald Trump and his reaction to the recent Black Lives Matter protests.

“Yeah, we had Barack Obama, and we really need him now,” he sung. “The man who stood behind him has to take his place somehow/ America has a leader building walls around our house/ Who don’t know Black lives matter, and it’s time to vote him out.”

Watch the full set here.

Neil Young
Neil Young. CREDIT: Matthew Baker/Getty Images

Neil Young recently shared a new open letter, criticising Donald Trump’s response to the Black Lives Matter protests being held across America and the world following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

“Although I think our president is responsible for a lot of this unrest we feel today as he has fanned the flames and tried to turn us against one another for his political reasons, I am thankful that we are all standing for what we believe, and I think we will be a better country for this,” he wrote.

Advertisement

Announcing the launch of the Fireside Sessions back in March, Young wrote: “Because we are all at home and not venturing out, we will try to do a stream from my fireplace with my lovely wife filming. It will be a down-home production, a few songs, a little time together.”

Neil Young released ‘Homegrown’ last month, a long-anticipated “lost” album from the mid-1970s. A five-star NME review of the album called it “a shimmering diamond well worth unearthing”.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement