No Rome, Beabadoobee and Oscar Lang for Dirty Hit 2019 UK tour

This is going to be a lot of fun.

The 1975‘s label Dirty Hit has announced details of a UK tour featuring three of its most promising rising acts.

The label, which is also home to Wolf Alice, Pale Waves and Marika Hackman, will be showcasing its talent with a joint tour from No RomeBeabadoobee and Oscar Lang.

Kicking off in Cambridge, the tour kicks off in Cambridge on November 26 and will take in 20 dates before culminating with a show at The Dome in London.

Full dates are below, with tickets on sale from Friday October 11 and available here.

NOVEMBER
26 – Cambridge, UK – The Portland Arms
27 – Norwich, UK – The Waterfront
28 – Brighton, UK – The Haunt
30 – Southampton, UK – The Joiners

DECEMBER
1 – Exeter, UK – The Cavern
2 – Plymouth, UK – The Junction
3 – Bournemouth, UK – The Anvil
5 – Cardiff, UK – The Globe
6 – Bristol, UK – The Louisiana
7 – Birmingham, UK – The Castle and Falcon
9 – Oxford, UK – The Bullingdon
10 – Nottingham, UK – The Bodega Social Club
11 – Stoke On Trent, UK – The Sugarmill
12 – Liverpool, UK – Arts Club
14 – Sheffield, UK – The Leadmill
15 – Leeds, UK – The Key Club
16 – Newcastle, UK – The Think Tank
17 – Glasgow – King Tuts Wah Wah Hut
18 – Manchester, UK – The Deaf Institute
20 – London, UK – The Dome

“Dirty Hit has taught me to be myself,” Beabadoobee told NME after she played at our Girls To The Front night earlier this year. “I don’t want to be biased, but the label makes me feel comfortable with who I am. I can do whatever I want, I feel like I could kind of fuck around and they could still be like “yeah that’s fine!””

Speaking about about what it takes for an artist to be signed by Dirty Hit, label boss told NME that anything goes.

“They would just have to send us music,” said Oborne. “It’s really easy to get my email, so do that. These days, it’s hard to find the artists that have to do it, rather than want to. It’s hard to figure that out when you meet someone for the first time. You just have to make me believe in you. If you can do that, then you can get me to do whatever you want. It doesn’t have to be commercial.”

Asked if style and genre played a part, Oborne replied: “No, not really. For instance, I’m obsessed with dub and reggae. Do you think there are some kids somewhere making that kind of music with spirit and social commentary? If there is a band like that in the UK, then I will sign you. It’s my dream to have a more melodic Bad Brains, or The Wailers. Can you imagine that? They’ve probably passed some people by.”