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Pete Doherty to pay £10,000 in settlement over ‘stolen’ Babyshambles lyrics

Kate Moss' name has also been removed as co-writer for the track 'Baddie's Boogie'

Pete Doherty has settled out of court for £10,000 with another artist after a claim that the lyrics to the track ‘Baddie’s Boogie’ were stolen, according to reports.

Poet and punk performer Nick Toczek noticed that the chorus of ‘Baddie’s Boogie’ – from Babyshambles‘ second album ‘Shotters Nation’ is almost identical to his 1983 poem ‘Stiff With A Quiff’, which he later recorded with his band The Burial.

The line in question is: “It’s a lousy life for the washed up wife of a permanently plastered, pissed up bastard.”

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The protracted legal battle has lasted for five years and Toczek’s lawyers have reportedly negotiated an out of court settlement worth nearly £10,000 with Doherty’s management.

Kate Moss’ writing credit has already been removed from the track. The model was credited as a co-writer of ‘Baddie’s Boogie’ on the original sleeve of ‘Shotters Nation’ but on the later live album and DVD ‘Oh What A Lovely Tour’, Toczek’s name appears instead.

“I got my solicitor on to this within weeks of the album being released,” Toczek told the Daily Mail. “After that, Kate Moss’ name never appeared among the writing credits for ‘Baddie’s Boogie’.”

In the legal settlement, Toczek is reportedly granted rights to 50 per cent of the song. He has also allegedly been paid £6,800 in damages by Stage Three Music Publishing and £1,400 by EMI, the singer’s label. He is owed a further £1,400 in royalties from the Performing Rights Society for Music.

Toczek said: “It is daft because if Pete Doherty had just picked up the phone and rung me and said can we use your lyrics, I would have said yes, just give me a credit.”

Last week (July 17), it was reported that Doherty had been thrown out of rehab in Thailand, after claims that he was being a “disruptive influence” on other patients.

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