Pussy Riot claim Russian police shut down video shoot over ‘gay propaganda’

The group says the video for БЕСИТ / RAGE was accused of breaking Russia’s gay propaganda law

Pussy Riot has said in a statement that Russian police stormed a music video shoot for a new song called ‘БЕСИТ / RAGE’, in Saint on Sunday (February 10).

According to a statement the band released overnight, the police cited the country’s “gay propoganda” and accused the queer feminist punk rock band of “extremism” and “making an illegal video” but failed to provide legal justification for the group’s removal from Lenfilm studio, where they were filming.

The band shared a video apparently showing Russian police relaying their allegations.
The shoot featured “150 activists, mostly female or queer,” the group added in the statement.

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They claim police barred Pussy Riot from bringing a generator to finish the shoot after they ordered Lenfilm to shut off the power.

The Russian ‘gay propaganda law’ is a bill that was unanimously approved by the State Duma on 11 June 2013 – with just one MP abstaining – and was signed into law by President Vladimir Putin on 30 June 2013.

Speaking to the Russian press, Lenfilm reportedly claimed the police in the video were actors and blamed the power outage to a technical issue.

Pussy Riot hit back on Instagram, writing: “Damn it, if the actor played this, he would have been given an Oscar.”

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They added: “We lost $15k on the video production today because of the absurd ‘gay propaganda’ law, and we’ll be thankful if you share this info and/or be kind enough to help us to raise the money to make this video happen anyway.”

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