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Queen launch new app which allows fans to sing just like Freddie Mercury

"Don't stop me now"

Queen have launched a new app which allows fans to sing like Freddie Mercury.

The app entitled FreddieMeter, shows users how closely their voice matches the late singer’s legendary range by analysing pitch, timbre, and melody to assign them a score of 0 to 100.

Fans can pick one of four songs on the app – ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’, ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’, ‘Somebody to Love’ or ‘We Are the Champions’ – and challenge friends.

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The device created by Google Creative Lab and Google Research has been trained on Mercury’s isolated vocals as well as samples of people trying to sing like him.

It has been launched in support of Mercury Phoenix Trust, a charity founded by Brian May, Roger Taylor and Jim Beach to raise awareness and funds for the fight against HIV/AIDS, and in honour of the 44th anniversary of the band’s first-ever live performance of ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ at the Empire Theatre in Liverpool in November 1975.

You can view footage below and download it here.

Meanwhile, May recently ruled out plans for the rock giants – who are touring with Adam Lambert – to play Glastonbury next year after clashing with Michael Eavis over the badger cull.

“We won’t [play Glastonbury] and there are a lot of reasons for that,” he said.

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He continued: “One of them is that Michael Eavis has frequently insulted me, and I don’t particularly enjoy that. What bothers me more is that he’s in favour of the badger cull, which I regard as a tragedy and an unnecessary crime against wildlife.

“There’s a little bit of a schism there, I wouldn’t do Glastonbury. Unless things changed radically.”

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