Rihanna faces backlash for wearing Ganesha pendant in “disrespectful” new photo

The singer wore the diamond pendant in a recent photo

Rihanna has faced backlash from Hindu fans after sharing a “disrespectful” Instagram photo in which she wears a diamond-studded pendant featuring a likeness of the Hindu god Ganesha.

In a series of comments posted on her Instagram, the singer has been accused of cultural appropriation for wearing the elaborate pendant.

“You’re wearing a deity necklace and a Murthi [representation of a deity] of my culture that’s already been culturally appropriated enough,” one fan wrote.

“How is this OK when a person has more than enough resources to at least find out the meaning and significance of the chains and the pendant around their neck?”

Another said: “Rihanna!! Stop using my religion as an aesthetic!! That ganesh figurine at the end of the chain is a holy and sacred figure for us hindus.”

One fan even suggested that the singer was wearing the necklace on purpose, after the singer attracted backlash earlier this month for drawing attention to ongoing farmers’ protests across India.

“This ain’t coincidence … this is after she supported that farmer protest,” they wrote.

The singer joined Greta Thunberg in supporting farmers across India, who have protested against controversial new agricultural laws that have been introduced by the government.

It comes after Rihanna previously attracted controversy in October last year, after using a song that sampled traditional Islamic text her in her Savage x Fenty fashion show.

The song ‘Doom’ by London producer Coucou Chloe included a remixed verse from the Hadith – which is considered to be a narrative record of direct sayings from the prophet Muhammad and his followers.

She later apologised, and described it as an “honest, yet careless” mistake.

Meanwhile, it was reported earlier this week that the singer’s lingerie brand Savage X Fenty is now worth $1billion (£719m).

NME has contacted Rihanna’s representatives for comment.

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