Save Our Scene announce new protests in London and Bristol to support struggling musicians

The two-wheeled protests come in support of musicians struggling due to Covid-19

Save Our Scene protests are set to take place in London and Bristol this week, supporting musicians struggling due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The two-wheeled protests came to London last month, with cyclists riding through the streets of the capital to raise awareness of musicians unable to receive financial support from the government during the pandemic.

A new protest will come to London on Wednesday (December 2), starting at 7pm GMT at Speakers Corner in Hyde Park and riding to Parliament Square.

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A second protest will take place the following day in Bristol, beginning on Clifton Down, also at 7pm. See full details of the protests below.

Save Our Scene founder George Fleming said: “As instructed by the Government, the music industry is getting on their bike. Our aim is to bring music lovers and professionals together and show the Government how important it is to protect the arts. We will be protesting until we see change, we cannot stop and must stand strong for what we believe in.

“The first protest in London was so successful back in October and we’re confident that it’s only going to get bigger. I’m excited to take the campaign to Bristol. The city is one of the most musically eclectic in the country. If you love music and have not been to Bristol before, now is your chance!”

Credit: Dan Billinghurst

See full details of the new Save Our Scene protests below.

London
Date: Wednesday 2nd December
Time: 19:00
Location: Hyde Park (Speakers Corner) to Parliament Square
DJ’s: Jess Bays b2b Josh Parkinson

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Bristol

Date: Thursday 3rd December
Time: 19:00
Location: Clifton Downs to St Andrew’s Park.
DJ’s: Got Some b2b Pablo Bravas

It was revealed back in September that a third of musicians could leave the industry due to financial losses brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

The Musicians Union revealed in April that 19% of their members were considering quitting a career in music due to a lack of government support during lockdown, with MU General Secretary Horace Trubridge voicing fears that the number may be much higher in a follow-up interview with NME.

Trubridge previously told NME that he believes the coronavirus to be the biggest crisis facing the music industry for 100 years.

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