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Stormzy reveals emotions after triumphant Glastonbury headline slot: “I thought I’d fucked it”

"I was crying for, like, an hour"

Stormzy has opened up about the emotion he felt following his triumphant Glastonbury set in the summer, saying “I thought I’d fucked it.”

Speaking to QStormzy said he was so upset with his performance afterwards that he came off stage and cried for close to an hour. Stormzy revealed that his in-ear sound monitors “blew” early on in the set, leaving him without sound for the rest of the performance.

Stormzy said: “It was the most difficult thing I’ve ever done. When I walked off stage I thought I’d fucked it. I thought it was the worst thing I’d ever done. I came off stage and thought I’d totally, absolutely blown it. I was crying for, like, an hour. I was in hysterics. Heartbroken, man.”

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Afterwards, Emily Eavis gave Stormzy a memory stick of the performance. “About halfway through [watching it] I was like, ‘Shit, it all went all right,'” Stormzy added.

Yesterday (November 19), Stormzy announced that he’ll be releasing his second album, ‘Heavy Is The Head’, next month.

The record is set for release on 13th December and sees him teaming up with the likes of Headie One, Ed Sheeran and H.E.R across sixteen tracks.

It also includes his recent releases across 2019, namely ‘Sounds of the Skeng’, ‘Crown’, Wiley Flow and ‘Vossi Bop’ which gave Stormzy his first ever UK Number One single.

The record’s title is also a lyric taken from ‘Crown’, while the artwork sees him looking wistfully at the Banksy-designed bulletproof vest he wore during his Glastonbury 2019 headline set.

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In a five star review of the show, NME said: “Stormzy’s Glastonbury was a reflection of the time we live in now. Being the second-youngest headliner in the festival’s history and the first black UK solo artist to have such a high billing would have weighed a lot on his shoulders.

“With anticipation before the night apprehensive, Stormzy does not put a foot wrong throughout. He shows exactly why he deserves to be here.”

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