The Flaming Lips’ Wayne Coyne: ‘I’ll die while taking a shit’

Frontman believes he'll have a heart attack on the toilet like Elvis Presley

The Flaming Lips frontman Wayne Coyne believes he’ll die by having a heart attack while on the toilet, just like Elvis Presley.

The ‘Do You Realize?’ singer has said he’d like to pop his clogs on stage – preferably while inside his infamous inflatable hamster ball – but envisages that he’ll most likely die while taking a shit.

Speaking to The Observer, Coyne revealed: “I think [dying in the ball] would be the greatest death ever. ‘Something’s happened in there!’ and then they open the bubble. ‘He’s dead’.”

Advertisement

He added:

I don’t think that will happen though. I’ll probably have a heart attack while taking a shit, like Elvis Presley.

In the interview, Coyne shirks off his good guy image by talking about his feud with The Social Network screenwriter Aaron Sorkin – who was originally on board to develop The Flaming Lips’ ‘Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robot’ musical – and Arcade Fire’s Win Butler, who he once accused of “treating people like shit on tour”.

He said: “[Win and I] laughed about it and we agreed we’d keep the feud going because it’s the only feud they’ve got. I really didn’t think he’d want to fight me. He’s pretty big and I’d have to be pretty scrappy.”

The Flaming Lips recently released a collaborative album, titled ‘The Flaming Lips And Heady Fwends’, which brought together an eclectic group of artists including Bon Iver, Ke$ha, Nick Cave, My Morning Jacket and Yoko Ono. A limited number of vinyl releases, which came out for Record Store Day in April, contained the blood of some of the artists who had contributed to the record.

Advertisement
Advertisement

General Election 2019: Conservatives declared winners after disastrous night for Labour

Jeremy Corbyn and Jo Swinson will both stand down as party leaders.

Edward Norton: “If you take your work seriously, it’s all-consuming”

The 'Fight Club' star on working with Thom Yorke, new film 'Motherless Brooklyn' and building a Hollywood legacy
Advertisement