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The View play secret show with their Libertines hero

The Kooks also make surprise collaboration in London

The View, The Kooks, former members of the 747s and Yeti all combined for a gig in London last night.

The bands teamed up for the surprise performances at the new Dharma Bums night at the Strong Room in the east of the city.

The Kooks kicked the evening off as frontman Luke Pritchard – taking tambourine and backing vocals – and guitarist Hugh Harris joined former members of the 747sOisin Leech and Massimo Signorelli along with The Basement’s Mark McCausland – to play as new band The Weirdos jamming out the likes of ‘Rain Kiss’ and ‘Heavy’ for their first ever performance.

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They were followed by The View’s Kyle Falconer and Pete Reilly who played a short, stripped-down set.

Opening with a cover of Squeeze’s ’Up The Junction’, the duo had to quickly teach the song to their stand-in bassist, not that they minded, as the man in question was one of their heroes, John Hassell formerly of The Libertines.

The trio then repeated the trick, again winging a version of The Beatles‘I’ve Seen A Face’ before dashing off.

However, clearly enjoying the evening, Hassell then summoned his Yeti bandmates to the stage for an unscheduled set, which saw them keep the Beatle-esque flavour going with a psychedelic selection of songs including the likes of ‘Merry Go Round’ and ‘In Like With You’ before wrapping up the evening.

“The whole philosophy of the evening was to get musicians to come down here and jam,” explained organiser and NME writer Kat Lister of the event, adding that everyone who played had got involved just because they wanted to play. “They’ve not been paid a penny and I think that’s an amazing thing.”

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