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Suge Knight: ‘Tupac’s not really dead’

Death Row Records mogul suggests that the rapper faked his 1996 death

Former Death Row Records label boss Suge Knight has suggested that rapper Tupac Shakur could still be alive.

The hip hop star – who appeared at last weekend’s Coachella Festival in hologram form – was shot and killed in Las Vegas in 1996.

Knight, however, who was with him on the night of his supposed murder, has now told Los Angeles radio station KDay – via TMZ – that the hip hop star faked his own death.

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Knight said: “Maybe the question is… Pac’s not really dead… Pac’s somewhere else.” He added that “Nobody seen Tupac dead”, when asked if anyone had ever seen the rapper’s body after he was killed.

He went on to say: “The person who supposedly cremated Tupac… this guy got about three million dollars… personally from me… cash… and next thing I know I never heard from the guy or seen him again… he retired and left.”

In October last year, an ex-LAPD detective claimed that P Diddy and Suge Knight ordered the murders of rappers Biggie Smalls and Tupac Shakur. Responding to the accusations, however, Diddy said: “This story is pure fiction and completely ridiculous.”

Earlier this year, Knight was arrested by police in the US for possession of marijuana. Knight, who was sentenced to 36 months probation for driving on a suspended license in August last year, was originally stopped by police for committing a driving offence.

Knight has twice been pulled up on charges of driving on a suspended license before, and was also arrested for assault with a deadly weapon in May 2010, when the rap mogul was picked up by police after allegedly pointing a gun at someone then leaving the scene by car.

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