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Watch Mac Miller discuss ‘Swimming’ with Rick Rubin in new ‘Shangri-La’ clip

The clip comes from the producer's new Showtime docuseries

A new clip has emerged of Mac Miller discussing the creation of his song ‘Swimming’ with Rick Rubin.

The new video is taken from the producer’s new Showtime docuseries ‘Shangri-La’.

Discussing the personal nature of his music, Mac says: “It’s been an interesting journey for me to realize that the goal here is to be as much me as possible. That’s it, that’s the only goal. And how we get that out of me and into whatever we’re making.”

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“It’s so scary, dude,” he admitted, to which Rubin responded: “If you think about it, your favorite records do that. Like the ones that you like that other people make, that’s the shit.”

It comes after the rapper’s first posthumous verse was released last month on ‘Free’, a new song from The Free Nationals, better known as the touring band of Anderson .Paak.

Mac Miller died last year aged 26 of “mixed drug toxicity”, with fentanyl, cocaine, and alcohol found in his system at the time of his death. The death was certified as an accidental overdose.

The rapper’s ex Ariana Grande has recently spoken about his death in a candid new interview. “He didn’t deserve the demons he had,” the star said in the chat with Vogue.

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“I never thought I’d even go to Coachella. I was always a person who never went to festivals and never went out and had fun like that. But the first time I went was to see Malcolm perform, and it was such an incredible experience,” she said.

“I went the second year as well, and I associate… heavily… it was just kind of a mindfuck, processing how much has happened in such a brief period.

“He was the best person ever, and he didn’t deserve the demons he had.”

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