Wet Leg make US TV debut with ‘Chaise Longue’ on ‘Seth Meyers’

It comes amid a string of performances hyping up their forthcoming debut album

Wet Leg made their debut on US television overnight, performing their viral hit ‘Chaise Longue’ on Late Night With Seth Meyers.

The duo – comprising Rhian Teasdale and Hester Chambers, who both sing and play guitar – performed the track with a three-piece backing band.

Chambers and Teasdale bounced off each other with a charming sprightliness, smirking at one another as they traded lines about how they “went to school and got the big D”. Take a look at the performance below:

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Wet Leg’s appearance on Seth Meyers comes amid a string of performances hyping up their forthcoming debut album; over the past few months, they’ve also played ‘Chaise Longue’ on Later With Jools Holland and in a Tiny Desk concert for NPR.

The self-titled album is due out April 8, 2022 via Domino. In addition to ‘Chaise Longue’, it’ll feature the singles ‘Too Late Now’ and ‘Oh No’. Currently touring them in the States, Wet Leg will premiere more tracks from the album live with an eight-date UK tour lined up for April.

Elsewhere, fans will be able to see Wet Leg – who NME labelled as a key act to catch at summer festivals – at next year’s Eurosonic Noorderslag and Isle Of Wight Festival.

In other Wet Leg news, the band were recently announced as next year’s ambassadors for Independent Venue Week. The 2022 event, which champions the annual celebration of independent music venues, will take place across the UK from January 31 to February 6.

Earlier this week, they were nominated for the BBC‘s Sound Of 2022 award, alongside the likes of Yard Act, PinkPantheress and Baby Queen. The winner of the annual prize will be revealed in January, after Pa Salieu picked up the crown in 2021.

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Speaking to NME about their surge of fame in 2021, Chambers said: “We could have never predicted this. We do feel really lucky – but we still have no idea what’s happening. I think we’re just going to live in the moment as much as we can. I just can’t imagine things ever getting better than they are now.

“We’ve been playing big stages that we haven’t properly grown into yet,” she added. “Even on a practical level it’s been a challenge; I’ve struggled with asking for what I want in my monitors and coping with the size of the crowds that have come to see us. But that’s OK. We’re always learning.”

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