The 2017 word of the year has been revealed – and it’s inspired by Jeremy Corbyn

There's a Youthquake on the way...

The word of the year for 2017 has been revealed by the Oxford Dictionaries, and it’s very much inspired by Labour’s success at the 2017 General Election.

‘Youthquake’ has been named as the word of the year, and it refers to Labour’s ability to rally up thousands of youngsters to support Jeremy Corbyn ahead of June’s election – which saw the Conservatives losing their parliamentary majority.

The word was chosen for its ability to define 2017, having seen a 400 per cent increase in usage between 2016 and 2017 and reflecting “the increased awareness of young people‚Äôs capacity to influence, and even drive, political change.”

The rest of the list was largely defined by politics, with the inclusion of ‘Antifa’, referring to a militant opposition to fascism – which comes amid the rise of the ‘Alt-Right’ and violent protests in America.

Other words included ‘Broflake’, referring to a man upset with progressive attitudes which are a conflict to his more conservative views.

Social media was also included on the list with ‘Milkshake Duck’ referring to something that ‘initially inspires delight on social media but is soon revealed to have a distasteful or repugnant past’.

Describing the choice to name ‘Youthquake’ as word of the year, Oxford Dictionaries President Casper Grathwohl said it was a “rare political word that sounds a hopeful note”.

“Sometimes you pick a word as the Word of the Year because you recognize that it has arrived, but other times you pick one that is knocking at the door and you want to help usher in”, he affirmed.