A judge has moved for Amanda Bynes’ conservatorship to be terminated

Bynes filed for the conservatorship to end last month, nine years after it commenced

Amanda Bynes’ conservatorship may soon be terminated, after the judge overseeing the former Nickelodeon star’s case ruled on Monday (March 21) that it is “no longer required” and the “grounds for establishment of a conservatorship of the person no longer exist”.

Bynes has been under her conservatorship since 2013, when she set a neighbour’s driveway on fire. Her mother Lynn has been in control of her personal, medical and financial affairs since then.

Bynes has been open about struggling with substance and mental health issues, and was ordered to attend a psychiatric facility by a judge in 2020. That said, the All That and The Amanda Show star has reportedly been sober for several years.

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Last month, after nine years, Bynes formally petitioned to end the conservatorship, with her lawyer David A. Esquibias saying the actor believed “her condition is improved and protection of the court is no longer necessary”.

Now, as TMZ reports, it is expected that Judge Roger L. Lund will officially terminate Bynes’ conservatorship on Tuesday (March 22) at Ventura County Superior Court.

In contrast to another recent high-profile conservatorship case – Britney Spears‘ – Bynes’ is moving relatively quickly because there are no objections to her petition and it has the backing of her parents. Last month, an attorney for Bynes’ parents told NBC News that her parents “100 percent support” her decision.

“The parents are happy, thrilled to get this good news. The professionals say she is ready to make her own life choices and decisions and are so proud of her,” the attorney, Tamar Arminak, said at the time.

Spears’ conservatorship – which she called “abusive” when petitioning for it to be terminated last year – finally came to an end after 13 years in November, two months after her father Jamie was suspended from his conservatorship role by the judge overseeing the case.

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